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are gorgeous. and talking about the energy. there's a beautiful energy. there's the light. the humor. the lighting is not perfect, but the woman in the red, but with the way flowers is turned to her left in the look of what can only be described as gleeful amusement. obviously something very funny headset in this photo was snapped in this group of women. delay, humor, playfulness and the interactions of the screw. this is unusual. but we are accustomed to seeing his images in dreariness, bleakness, depictions that on the surface communicate injustice. if you are familiar, toyota to miyake's photograph of three boys advance in our stand to end looking wistfully across a barbed wire fence come a black-and-white image. that's the classic image of japanese-american incarceration. this is something quite different. notice the contrast between the beauty of the subject in the bleakness of the backdrop. the dry, parched ground they stand on. tarpaper barracks they lived in. the chimney of the communal masala. it is again something i suggested in the early photograph the openness of japanese
that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour to totalitarian but it's a very traditional autocrat. >> one of the interesting hinges of this book is your discussion about the fall of the berlin wall, and if i read it right, you say that it may appear optimists. it made us to convinced that himeno agencies our system of democracy, system of free markets would have the transforming power. >> talk about that and take that story through the 1980's and into the 90's. >> the fall of the berlin wall eliminated constraints. we thought because we can get to the red army out of eastern europe it suddenly with a transforming effect in the middle east and sub-saharan afric
and the senate becomes the center of governmental energy and creativity. working, and founding fathers wanted, he is majority leader for six years. at an end six years he leaves. instantly the senate is back in the same mess. the nature of political genius is to find a way, when no way appears obvious. i don't have any idea what president johnson would do, hopefully i could research it. someone will come along to do it again. >> one of the major events in this book is the u.s. role and overthrow -- johnson is on record in the cabinet meetings opposing it. can you elaborate on what particularly drove his stance and what particularly was that on that and why he believed the way he did on that point? one of the things he agreed with robert kennedy on. >> can i take a pass on that one question? the reason is is at the beginning of the book i am writing now. it is -- the answer is so complicated, i don't have a summation of it in my mind right now. >> can i go back and refer to your book that you are talking about now than? you alluded when you stated united states was running under the kennedy admini
:45 and then off to mass every day. he spent an incredible amount of julieanna energy, and i think the fact that he saw every day the gift from god as corny as that sounds interacting with you was as big a deal to him as it was interacting with president kennedy because i think that he saw having been in the war and experienced the depression and really believe in that every person and every interaction was a gift, and i think people get burned out a lot in public service. often times because it is really about them. and i think he didn't get burned out even though he is 95. he was always asking about other people, how you were doing because he was so confident he had a relationship with god, but that god had given him that interaction and that human being. did you both serve in the peace corps? did you meet in the peace corps? did you get married before you went into the peace corps? were you serving in the same country? you were? okay good. it's romantic, right? [laughter] and you are still married, right? [laughter] maybe not. i don't know. [laughter] [applause] that's fantastic. that's unbeliev
energy source is used we more. so, it's kind of, you know, there is a peacekeeping one of these evils. it's just that it personally you try to get rid of the problem and i think it is a bigger problem, and then it goes back to making sure they're somehow done in a better way and pick and choose where you put them. one thing we haven't talked about a very frustrating thing that i learned in this book is that there is no stopping mining the state's road along 1972 the general mining law act that basically was like the homestead act that said get people out west and what they said is you pay $5 an acre on the the federal land and you can mind. right now the companies making billions of dollars are paying $5 an acre to the united states. they are making billions. worse than that there is no royalty. if you mine for oil and gas in this country pay eight to 10% copper, nothing. worse than that the way that it's written we have no ability to say no. nothing so we can't stop it even if we want to i must change it and we can't because congress has enough people from the west and various power sour
. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film on memorial day 2010. since then with the help of so many volunteers, and i can't name them all, that project has sent over seven tons of school supplies to our soldiers and marines in humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthews small town of richmond hill and outlying city of savannah and their great army bases of ft. stewart and hunter army airfield and the savannah aircard have helped me heal by supporting the matthew freeman project and our annual veterans day captain matthew freeman 5k run for piece. last night i dedicated a memorial in our town to captain matthew freeman project proudly announced a new scholarship that we will be starting for the siblings of the fallen in combat. these are the forgotten mourners who often sacrifice and postpone their education to comfort family or deal with their own grief. after 11 years at war very few people know about goldstar families. these are parents, siblings, thousands of children who survived the death of their loved one. as a mother of a fallen marine, i'm su
all of the energy that ought to go into planning cyber war to a bunch of legal abstract debates. and the generals are sitting in the sideline saying, well, tell me what i can do. this is exactly the wrong way to treat government lawyers or maybe lawyers generally. much more effective if you say, we sat down and tell what it would take to win a cy reward. after we worked it through, the only way we can win is if we do this. is that legal? then you're going to get useful legal advice. probably they will find a way to say it is because most lawyers do not want to cause us to lose the next war. if you wait until they tell you what you can do, you will never know what you can do and you will never know how to win the cyber war. this i fear is where we are today. >> what you take of this view? >> i'm not actually sure i follow that restricting. i would like to think you for putting this together and particularly this book. so many of the issues that we have in lot today are very complex, and we have to have a way to access the broader our audience. just by the fact that this is that t
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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